A National Honor Society Run by Students

“The Quill and Scroll National Journalism Honor Society is a recognition of students who go above and beyond in the realm of media publications for yearbook and newspaper publications around the country,” said James Amato, chartered advisor to Woodland’s Quill & Scroll Honor Society.

Woodland is a chartered member of the Quill & Scroll National Journalism Honor Society. To become a member, you must apply to the quill & scroll which is signed off by the principal and journalism director, who must pay any associated fees as well. After this process, students must complete an application to partake in this society

“You might be encouraged to submit an application, but it’s not a mandatory requirement for the class,” said Amato. “You must be at least a sophomore, have an 85 average in all your classes, and be recommended by a teacher outside of your advisor.”

“You might be encouraged to submit an application, but it’s not a mandatory requirement for the class,” said Amato. “You must be at least a sophomore, have an 85 average in all your classes, and be recommended by a teacher outside of your advisor.”

They are also tracked via black binders for each individual journalist to hold their work. These can also be used as portfolios for college as it contains every project a journalist has worked on. Published media included in these binders are entered into individual media masters sheets that total all points received from only published work for each individual journalist. The majority of this process is student led and organized with guidance of the journalism director.

Not only is the journalism class itself run by students but so is the Quill & Scroll Honor Society. The staff on the elected board, if there are enough students to run an election for officers, have only one requirement to maintain the charter, which is to do a journalism service project. One year when the Woodland National Honor Society organized an eighth grade orientation day, they hosted a seminar on what journalism was for Hawk Headlines. Middle school students were then able to become aware of the journalism program and what they did before entering high school the following year.

Recently their plan was to hold a journalism convention at Woodland, which had other schools and professionals coming to speak to journalists that attended. This event had to be canceled during the end of the 2020 school year due to COVID, but there are plans to create a virtual version of this convention instead.